Racial healing circles provide a transformative space for personal growth, fostering open discussions, healing, education, and progress toward racial justice.  These circles create a secure environment that empowers individuals to become catalysts for positive change. 

This event is exclusive;  if you are interested in bringing this program to your organization, please contact either Sonia Lopez, slopez2@illinois.edu or Maria Gutiérrez, maraiza@illinois.edu

The series will be delivered in Spanish.

Racial healing circles provide a transformative space for personal growth, fostering open discussions, healing, education, and progress toward racial justice.  These circles create a secure environment that empowers individuals to become catalysts for positive change. 

This event is exclusive;  if you are interested in bringing this program to your organization, please contact either Sonia Lopez, slopez2@illinois.edu or Maria Gutiérrez, maraiza@illinois.edu

The series will be delivered in Spanish.

Racial healing circles provide a transformative space for personal growth, fostering open discussions, healing, education, and progress toward racial justice.  These circles create a secure environment that empowers individuals to become catalysts for positive change. 

This event is exclusive;  if you are interested in bringing this program to your organization, please contact either Sonia Lopez, slopez2@illinois.edu or Maria Gutiérrez, maraiza@illinois.edu

The series will be delivered in Spanish.

Join us for a transformative day dedicated to healing and reconciliation within our community. The Healing Circle: Day of Racial Healing is a safe and inclusive space where individuals from all backgrounds can come together to acknowledge, understand, and address the impacts of racial injustice. Through guided discussions, storytelling, and reflective activities, we will explore the complexities of race relations and work towards fostering empathy, understanding, and healing. Together, let's commit to creating a more equitable and compassionate society. All are welcome to participate in this essential journey towards unity and healing.

We served over 500 pallets to 65 different organizations with different backgrounds so they can go into the underserved communities with supplies, shoes, clothes, food washing, detergent, free pharmacy, free therapy Can we talked about the barriers? The minority non-profits have when it comes to fundraising, but those that are boots on the ground. There was raised in the minority communities and a racial discrepancies that big donors cannot give to minority non-profits directly with long RFPs that are difficult to fill out. But the world keeps using minority faces on commercials and shelters. But we don't have tangible buildings, cars, trucks, food trucks, disaster relief, but we're hit more often with a national disaster and losing our jobs. We want to make sure that large companies understand that in order to help crime and health, you must serve directly funding for BIPOC COMMUNITIES

In-Lak'ech Ala K'in: "Tu eres mi otro yo," I am you; you are me.
A Mayan term that explains how the "other" is me and I am the "other" simultaneously. As I care for them, I care for myself.
I am you; you are me." On the National Day of Racial Healing, it is time to reflect on our shared values and create collaboration, reflecting ourselves on the "others." We placed students in front of each other and asked them to identify similarities and differences.
At Raíces, we believe that a different world is possible, and we must open our hearts to recognize ourselves in the other. We understand these values and practice them daily at school. EQUALITY, RESPECT, DIFFERENCE, DIVERSITY, SOLIDARITY, UNDERSTANDING, FREEDOM, JUSTICE.

Join #HipHopEd for our weekly Twitter (X) spaces discussion. Tonight we are discussing how Hip Hop and Education can be viable vehicles for imagining and then working towards what racial healing can look like in our classrooms and communities. Follow us on (X) @therealhiphoped, @chrisemdin, and @tdj6899

In-Lak'ech Ala K'in: "Tu eres mi otro yo," I am you; you are me.
A Mayan term that explains how the "other" is me and I am the "other" simultaneously. As I care for them, I care for myself and vice-versa.

I am you; you are me." On the National Day of Racial Healing, it is time to reflect on our shared values and create collaboration, reflecting ourselves on the "others." We placed students in front of each other and asked them to identify similarities and differences.

NOTE: This is a video link to be watched at any time. K-5 Students and teachers discuss differences and similarities between each other based on Respect, Empathy, and Love.

E Pluribus Unum is hosting a special screening of ORIGIN, written and directed by Ava DuVernay. ORIGIN chronicles the tragedy and triumph of Pulitzer Prize winning journalist Isabel Wilkerson as she investigates a global phenomenon of epic proportions. Portrayed by Academy Award nominee Aunjanue Ellis-Taylor (“King Richard”), Isabel experiences unfathomable personal loss and love as she crosses continents and cultures to craft one of the defining American books of our time. Inspired by the New York Times best-seller “Caste,” ORIGIN explores the mystery of history, the wonders of romance and a fight for the future of us all.

E Pluribus Unum (EPU), nonprofit, nonpartisan organization whose mission is to build a more just, equitable, and inclusive
South, uprooting the barriers that have long divided the region by race and class. EPU is focused on changing the divisive narratives that perpetuate systemic and interpersonal racism, cultivating and empowering courageous leaders who are advancing
racial equity, and championing transformative policy change.

The National Day of Racial Healing (NDORH) Viewing Party will be an informal gathering of W.K. Kellogg Foundation Detroit Team members and grantee partners to view the NDORH televised video and engage in discussion around our racial healing journeys.